Tag Archives: Mark Bowser

Peas in the Garden

Enjoy this episode from the podcast “Let Me Tell You a Story with Mark Bowser.” Subscribe to the podcast feed at your favorite place for listening to podcasts.

Yankee Doodle Came To Town

By Mark Bowser

“Yankee doodle came to town riding on a pony, stuck a feather in his hat, and called him macaroni.”

We all know the words but do we know the heritage? How a song that was designed to ridicule became a victory cry of triumph.

The famous tune Yankee Doodle was written by Dr. Richard Schuckburgh. He was a British surgeon during the time of the French and Indian war.

Dr. Shuckburgh, as well as many British, loved to make fun of the American cousins. During the French and Indian War, the rustic Americans fought on the side of the British. The Americans would march alongside the sharp dressed, well trained British Redcoats. The good doctor took this contrast and made it a joke.

British soldiers had great fun making up their own versus for this little song. But things changed on the way to Lexington. On April 19, 1775, the British troops were singing Yankee Doodle as they were marching from Boston towards Lexington and Concord.

All of a sudden, the now tone deaf British found themselves in a battle against the rebels. The colonials hid behind trees and under rocks and pummeled the Redcoats as they marched by. The American War for Independence had begun.

As the Redcoats retreated hastily from the battlefield, they could hear that old familiar tune again … but, this time it was sung by the Americans. And, on that day, the Americans captured the song as their own and it became a patriotic classic to this day. The Americans began to refer to the song as the Lexington March.

During the war, the Americans found great joy in playing this song as the British surrendered at key battles such as Saratoga and the war ending Yorktown. At the surrender at Saratoga,Tom Anbury, a British Army officer said, “It was not a little mortifying to hear them play this tune, when their army marched down to our surrender.”

Not bad for a bunch of rebels. This is Mark Bowser. Thanks for reading.

*Mark Bowser is the author of several books including “Some Gave It All” with Danny Lane (endorsed by Chuck Norris), “Sales Success” with Zig Ziglar, and “Jesus, Take the Wheel.” As a Professional Speaker, he has presented prestigious seminars at Southwest Airlines, Ford Motor Company, United States Marine Corp., Princeton University, Purdue University, Kings Daughters Medical Center, USDA, FedEx Logistics, and many more. Mark can be reached at http://www.MarkBowser.com or http://www.LinkedIn.com/in/markbowser.

The Corporal’s Lesson on Greatness

By Mark Bowser

In her wonderful volumes on American history, Mara Pratt shared a story about George Washington that we should all take to heart.

One day during the American Revolution, General George Washington rode upon a number of soldiers who were working to raise a beam up to the top of a military structure. The men somehow didn’t recognize Washington.

All the men were working except one. That one man continued to bark out orders. He yelled at the other men, “Now you have it! Already! Pull!”

Washington guided his horse a little closer to the order barking soldier. He quietly asked the soldier why he wasn’t helping the others. The young man looked up at Washington and angrily said, “Sir, don’t you know that I am the corporal?

Washington said, “I did not realize it. Beg pardon, Mr. Corporal.”

Washington then got off his horse, walked over to the soldiers and began helping them move the heavy beam. The General continued until the beam was put in place on top of the structure. Then, with sweat pouring down his face, he turned to the corporal and said, “If ever you need assistance like this again, call upon Washington, your commander- in-chief, and I will come.”

What is it that makes a great leader? Simply, a servant’s heart.

Thanks for reading today!

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The Boy Who Would Become a Saint

By Mark Bowser

In the waning days of the Roman empire’s rule, a young 16 year old boy was kidnapped and taken to a faraway land where he was tortured with hard labor for many years.

After five years, he fortunately was able to escape. He walked 200 miles to the shore where he was able to find passage on a ship. Finally, the boy arrived back home.

As you can imagine, his family was overjoyed and shocked to see their beloved son back home again.

Looking forward to the first peaceful night’s sleep in his own bed, The boy instead found a night of turmoil and unrest. His dreams were disturbing. Some might even call them visions.

The visions continued night after night. In his nightly visits, the boy was told to go back to the land of his tormentors and to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ to them. Finally, with great resolve, the boy left home on his quest and returned to the land of his tormentors — Ireland.

Would he have to face the Celtic tribesman who had kidnapped him those many years ago? Would he be kidnapped again? Would he ever seen his homeland again? The boy didn’t know. All he knew was that he was a servant of the Most High God and on a mission to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Was he successful in his mission? Yes. Almost the entire population of Ireland converted to Christianity. And who was the boy to become? None other than Saint Patrick, the honored saint of the island of Ireland. Thanks for reading today.

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Edison’s Fire: How Do Champions Respond to Tragedy?

By Mark Bowser

Thomas Edison was one of the most prolific and influential inventors of all time. He changed all of our lives with inventions such as the incandescent light bulb, the phonograph, the movie camera and viewer, and the alkaline storage battery. Can you imagine what life would be like if we didn’t have these daily luxuries?

But, what does a genius like this do when tragedy strikes? Well, let’s find out. In December of 1914, a fire broke out at the Edison laboratories. Over $2 million in damages was done. The first tragedy was that there was only $238,000 of insurance on the labs. Why so little? Because the buildings were made of concrete and it was believed that the concrete made them fireproof. People also thought the Titanic was unsinkable. Now we know better.

But the biggest tragedy went beyond financial. All the projects and all the new inventions that he was working on went up in flames that night. All his notes, all is tinkering, all the projects – gone!

When Edison’s 24-year-old son Charles heard of the fire, panic struck his heart. He looked frantically for his father hoping that he was not in the laboratories when they went up in flames. He finally found his father standing quietly, calmly, and thoughtfully watching the flames engulf his dreams.

Edison looked at his son and asked if he knew where his mother was. He then said “… Bring her here. She will never see anything like this as long as she lives.”

The next morning, the 67-year-old Edison looked at the remains of his laboratories and said, “There is great value in disaster. All our mistakes are burned up. Thank God we can start anew.”

So, how does a champion deal with tragedy? They look forward. They look for the opportunities. They look for the good. And, they thank God for fresh starts.

*Mark Bowser is Professional Business Speaker and Author of several books including “Nehemiah on Leadership,” “Sales Success” with Zig Ziglar and Scott McKain, “Jesus, Take the Wheel,” and “Some Gave It All” with Danny Lane (endorsed by Chuck Norris)

Mark Bowser is the host of the popular podcast “Let Me Tell You a Story with Mark Bowser.” Available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google, and other major podcast platforms.

Mark Bowser can be reached at http://www.MarkBowser.com.

Episode 28: Start Small & Build Huge Success the Disney Way

Sneak Preview of upcoming podcast episode of “Let Me Tell You a Story with Mark Bowser” https://youtu.be/zP086dp5T3A

Was George Washington Bulletproof?

By Mark Bowser

Is it possible for a person to be bulletproof? Protected beyond all measure of human understanding? America’s foremost historian, David Barton, shared a story that used to be found in almost every American history text book for one hundred and fifty years. Today, most students and Americans have never heard this story.

The story takes place twenty years before the American War for Independence. George Washington was a young man of twenty-three years old when he was called to duty in the French and Indian War. The war was between the United Kingdom and France. Both sides had claimed ownership of the land around the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. A peaceful agreement couldn’t be made so war broke out between the two European powers.

The Americans joined the British side and most of the Native Americans joined with the French. At the time, George Washington was Colonel of the Virginia Militia.  George Washington and one hundred of his militia joined with General Braddock to kick the French out of Fort Duquane which is now the city of Pittsburgh.

On July 9, 1755, they walked right into an ambush.  The British were still about seven miles from the fort marching in the midwestern wilderness when all of sudden they began taking on fire from both sides of their path. The French and Indians shot at them from all angles: from behind trees, underneath logs, sheltered from rocks, and even from above in the top of trees.

 The British were some of the world’s best and most experienced soldiers. Unfortunately, it was at European style of warfare.  In that style, both armies would line up in straight lines on opposite sides of a field and bravely fire at each other.

So, in the middle of a wilderness, the British did what they had been trained to do. They  lined up shoulder to shoulder neatly as if they were marching in a parade. They were easy pickings for the enemy. The Indians and French protected by their hiding places took out the British with ease. In only two hours, over 700 of the 1,300 British and Virginia Militia troops were slaughtered. Only thirty of the French and Indians had been shot. 

George Washington was the only officer who was not shot off of his horse. This twenty three year old militia leader found himself in command of what was left of the British army. What should he do? Continue to fight?  Washington knew what he had to do. He must save what was left of his men.  Washington gathered up the remaining troops and retreated back to Fort Cumberland.

 During the battle, several horses had been shot from underneath Washington. Later, Washington found four bullet holes in his jacket, but he had not been touched by one bullet. He told his family in a letter that,“By the all powerful dispensations of Providence, I have been protected beyond all human probability or expectation.” Washington knew he was protected by Almighty God. There was not a doubt in his mind about that. 

Fifteen years later in 1770, George Washington and a close friend returned to those same woods where the battle had been fought.  An Indian Chief heard that Washington was there and traveled far to meet with him.  The Native American Chief told Washington that he had been a leader in that great battle and that he had instructed his braves to single out all the officers, including Washington.  The Chief himself had shot at Washington seventeen times without success.  Believing that Washington was under the protection of the Great Spirit, the Chief told his braves to quit firing on Washington.

 On that day in 1770, the Chief told Washington, “I have traveled a long and weary path that I might see the young warrior of the great battle.  I have come to pay homage to the man whose is the particular favorite of Heaven and who can never die in battle.”  

There was a time when most American children were taught that story in school about our first President. Today, most Americans have never heard that story. A recent poll stated that only 40% of Americans have a basic knowledge of American history. That is very sad … and dangerous. Philosopher George Santayana said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

That lesson goes both directions. Today, there are ignorant cries to tear down statues in an attempt to erase part of our history. But, if we don’t remember the mistakes of the past then we are condemned to repeat them.

There is evil in parts of history. We must never repeat the sins of the past. So, we must understand history.  We must understand how the Hitler of the 1930’s became the Hitler of the 1940’s and killed over eleven million Jewish people. We must understand the history of slavery and how one man, Abraham Lincoln, led the fight to end that scourge in the United States in 1863.

History is not without evil … but we must remember it. History is also filled with stories of good and we must remember them too. We must walk on the shores of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina and remember the Wright Brothers and man’s leap into a bigger world. We must remember that first shaky flight and how it shined a light onto the path that led us to Tranquility Base on July 20, 1969 where Neil Armstrong took “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” So, is it possible to be bulletproof and protected beyond all measure of human understanding? Oh yeah!

ANNOUNCING! A New Podcast Gaining Attention — Let Me Tell You A Story with Mark Bowser

Stories are everywhere! We all love them! We love them in books, at the movies, and in our favorite podcasts. But, what if a story could be — more? What if a story could change your life in a substantial, positive way? What if a story could take you to the pinnacles of success and show you how to scale life’s mountains too?

Well, that is what Let Me Tell You a Story podcast with Mark Bowser is all about. Professional Speaker & Author Mark Bowser will take you behind the scenes of some of history’s greatest feats and unknown achievements so that their stories can be a city on a hill shining like a beacon in the night inspiring us to live our best! Come join us every Monday and Thursday! Please subscribe now so that you won’t miss one exciting episode. Available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google, etc….

Subscribe Now with your favorite podcast platform. For more information, please use the link below:

https://pinecast.com/feed/stories

The Forgotten President

By Mark Bowser

Was George Washington really the first President of the United States? Are you sure?

George Washington became President of the United States in 1789, however, we won the War for Independence in 1781 to earn our freedom from Great Britain. So, what happened during all those intervening years? Were we leaderless? Did we have a functioning government in those years?

After we won the war at Yorktown, the Congress met and drafted a document called the Articles of Confederation. In essence, this was the first Constitution for the United States. And on March 1, 1781 it was ratified by all thirteen colonies making it the law and guiding principles for the infant nation.

At that time Congress elected unanimously a President of the United States. The official title was President of the United States in Congress Assembled. The man the Congress unanimously elected was John Hanson.

John Hanson served for only one year. During that pivotal year, Congress established the Treasury Department. Two other prominent establishments during the Hansen administration included the adoption of the Great Seal of the United State. This seal is still in use to this day. Another prominent accomplishment was that the fourth Thursday of every November would be a day of thanksgiving.

But, did this really make Hanson the first President of the United States? How come we didn’t learn about him in our history classes in school?

George Washington considered Hanson the first president. He addressed him in his correspondence by that title and he congratulated Hansen by saying, “I congratulate your Excellency on your appointment to fill the most important seat in the United States.”

After Hanson’s term was up, Congress elected another president. This went on until the Constitution was adopted in 1789. That is when George Washington was elected President of the United States. So, if we want to get technical about it, Washington was the eighth president, not the first.

But, it is very proper and fitting that George Washington is considered the father of our country and the first President of the United States. He is the first president under the Constitution of the United States. A document that is revered for its wisdom and rights to the people.

So, next year when we celebrate Presidents’ Day, let’s not forget Mr. Hanson and the other six forgotten presidents under the Articles of Confederation. And, let’s celebrate all of the presidents and future presidents that have helped lead the greatest nation in the history of the world. So, now you know. Thanks for reading today.

The Extra Ingredient of Success

By Mark Bowser

What is that little extra ingredient that can take us from the jaws of defeat and thrust us onto the mountain peak of success? In his book, Beware the Naked Man Who Offers You His Shirt, Harvey McKay tells a wonderful story. In 1988, the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team led by Coach Lou Holtz was undefeated. Their next game was against the also undefeated Miami Hurricanes. The game was to be played on the Notre Dame campus in South Bend, Indiana.

These two teams were considered the two best football teams in college football. It was believed that the national championship would come down to these two teams at the end of the season.

The night before the big game, Notre Dame held a pep rally on campus. That pep rally had twenty thousand people in attendance. They yelled cheers, sang the school fight song, and really pumped everyone up.

At the very end, Coach Holtz stood to speak. His remarks were short and they ended with this: “I just want you to do me a very simple favor. You go find Jimmy Johnson (the Miami coach) and tell him we are going to beat the dog out of Miami.”

As you can imagine, the students went crazy. They leapt to their feet, they clapped their hands, and they cheered with everything they had … all except the team. The team stood there quietly looking at the ground and shuffling their feet. This had been going on during the entire pep rally. This behavior didn’t go unnoticed by Coach Holtz.

Why did Coach Holtz say such a provocative statement that was sure to get Miami all pumped up … and put a lot of pressure on the Fighting Irish at the same time? Because he knew what his team needed at that moment. The team needed motivation and a belief in themself!

In the previous four head-to-head games between Notre Dame and Miami, the Hurricanes had gotten the better hand … dramatically. In fact, they had dominated over the Irish. In those four games they had a combined score of 133 to 20. This truth had not been forgotten by the Notre Dame football players. No wonder they were a little down in the dumps.

After the pep rally, the team was to meet across campus for what was known as a chalk talk. Back then, coaches didn’t have the fancy equipment and smart boards that they have today. They had a blackboard and a piece of chalk.

As soon as Coach Holtz and his team met for their chalk talk, coach picked up a piece of chalk and he wrote on the board “We are going to beat the dog out of Miami”

He then looked at his team and asked, “Why did I say that?” He heard crickets. Nobody responded. So, coach repeated his question. “Why did I say that?”

One hand went up. Holtz gestured with one hand and the player said, “Because we’ve got a better kicking game.” Holtz then went on to write “better kicking game” on the board.

Coach then asked, “Is that it?”

Finally, another player shyly raised his hand. That player said, “Our offensive line gets off quicker than theirs.” Holt wrote that on the board too and then asked, “Anything else?”

Another player said with more confidence now, “Pass defense.…”

This went on for little while with Coach Holtz writing each of the phrases that the players said on the board. With each phrase, the confidence begin to grow in the room. Pretty soon, the team began to believe in themselves.

Coach Holtz paused and looked at his team. He then raised his voice and asked, “Who’s going to get an interception for Notre Dame tomorrow? Who’s going to get a sack for Notre Dame tomorrow? Who’s going to strip the ball and recover it for Notre Dame?”

After each question, a number of hands went up. What was the result of all this motivation? Notre Dame won the game 31 to 30. Motivation is that little extra that can take you from the valley of defeat to the mountain peak of success. And, later that season, Notre Dame won the national championship.

ANNOUNCING! A New Podcast Gaining Attention — Let Me Tell You A Story with Mark Bowser

Stories are everywhere! We all love them! We love them in books, at the movies, and in our favorite podcasts. But, what if a story could be — more? What if a story could change your life in a substantial, positive way? What if a story could take you to the pinnacles of success and show you how to scale life’s mountains too?

Well, that is what Let Me Tell You a Story podcast with Mark Bowser is all about. Professional Speaker & Author Mark Bowser will take you behind the scenes of some of history’s greatest feats and unknown achievements so that their stories can be a city on a hill shining like a beacon in the night inspiring us to live our best! Come join us every Monday and Thursday! Please subscribe now so that you won’t miss one exciting episode. Available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google, etc….

Subscribe Now with your favorite podcast platform or use the link below:

https://pinecast.com/feed/stories

Episode 10: Let Me Tell You. Story podcast